Nobility

Nobility:

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Nobility Rankings bring with it a potential for 'Barony Game Play', and statistics that can be used to determine what is going on, usually moderated by the National Referee for minor plot or storytelling on the ELEMENT forums, and statistics around the holdings that a character may possess or be in charge of. Details of this can be found in the ELEMENT Skills Companion (Pages 91-101).

Experience Points Costs

Level: Rank: Cost:
1 Knight 15
2 Lord Knight 20
3 Baron 25
4 Earl 50
5 Duke 100

Level One: Knight: Has by right of ownership, a small land holding referred to as a ‘Manor’, this includes between two to five villages and outlying farmland (where applicable) with a number of civilians under their protection (the average is one hundred per village). The ‘Manor’ is considered self-sufficient and can be a source of plot; it also provides the Knight with an annual income of 10 Gold Crowns, issued by the Trade Referee at the start of a gaming year, if the character is there for the Winter Period. A Knight usually has to run a Manor for at least a year before being able to attain further manors, unless something occurs during game play. The title of Knight is used for both male and female when bestowed upon a character, of course other societies within the game system may chose alternative titles befitting their nation.

Level Two: Lord Knight: Has by right of ownership, between two and five ‘Manors’, which are of equal description to the manor covered in the details for a Knight. Manors may be run by children of the Lord Knight or trusted friends or sworn swords who are answerable to the Lord Knight. The manors are not necessarily joined to one another and may be spread far and wide within a given country, self-sufficient and a probable source of plot; they provide the Lord Knight with an annual income of 20 Gold Crowns, issued by the Trade Referee at the start of a gaming year, if the character is within the kingdom during the Winter Period. A female ‘Lord Knight’ is referred to as a ‘Lady Knight’.

Level Three: Baron: Has by right of ownership a large region of land referred to as a ‘Barony’, which is comprised of anywhere between fifteen to twenty-five manors; most manors are run by Knights who answer to the Baron. A barony is considered to be self-sufficient and will more than likely be a source of plot as well as prestige by having a small castle within which they live; a baron can expect an annual income of 30 Gold Crowns issued by the Trade Referee at the start of a gaming year. A female ‘Baron’ is referred to as a ‘Baroness’.

Level Four: Earl: Has been given the ruler-ship of a region equal to a ‘County’, this county is made from an average of either fifty manors or four baronies, all such titled lands within the county answer directly to the Earl. A county is considered to be self-sufficient and will be a source of plot and prestige by having a castle within which they live; The Earl can expect an annual income of 40 Gold Crowns issued to them at the start of the year by the Trade Referee. A female ‘Earl’ is referred to as a ‘Countess’.

Level Five: Duke: Is by general principle, the highest rank outside of royalty a person can attain. A ‘dukedom’ or ‘duchy’ is comprised of between three and ten counties, all of which answer directly to the Duke. A duchy is considered to be self-sufficient and will be a source of constant plot and prestige by having a large castle within which they live and several other castles of varying size; the Duke can expect an annual income of 50 Gold Crowns issued to them by the Trade Referee at the start of the gaming year. A female ‘Duke’ is referred to as a ‘Duchess’.

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